(Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith


  • Hardcover
  • 630
  • Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith
  • Tim Mackintosh-Smith
  • English
  • 10 September 2020
  • 9780300180282

10 thoughts on “(Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

  1. says: Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read

    Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read With little written history but a whole lot of oral tradition its little wonder that Tim has taken writing about the Arabs

  2. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith One of the most fascinating books I have ever read Mackintosh Smith masterfully weaves the history of the Arabs through the lens of the evolution of the Arabic language articulating his mastery of the Arabic language and how it has shaped the people in turn I learned a massive amount from this book The history read like a thriller and the author is an incredible story teller However towards the end of the book the author's hatred of Israel

  3. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith An excellent and enormous 536 pages plus end matter history of the Arab people whatever that means; as Mackintosh

  4. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith This book can’t be rated The author is rabidly anti Israel As examples the books says that the only place that post holocaustJews could be sent without causing a problem was Antartica p 442 the book cites pre 1948 Jewish terrorism but no Arab terrorism against the Jews eg p 462 the book does not mention the UN resolution about Israel the Israelis acceptance of the UN boundaries or the other nations’ recognition of I

  5. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Tim Mackintosh Smith is one of those romantic Englishmen who used to go and settle in far off lands and go native He lives in Yemen apparently still there even during the civil war and has been writing about the region and the Arab people for several decades This book is the culmination of a lifetime of study a comprehensive history of a people and civilization to which he has become attached and about whom he knows than most It is well w

  6. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

    (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith In 1992 on a flight from Cairo to Sana'a I found myself sitting next to an Englishman of almost exactly my age who was returning to his home in Yemen Smalltalk developed into conversation which developed into an offer of a lift from the airport into the city Once he had blagged his way through immigration he didn't have a visa the lift developed into an offer to stay at his house for the night which led to me using his house as my base fo

  7. says: Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith This is a humane scholarly but highly readable book by one of that diminishing breed the sensitive British Arabist who is as much Arab as British and who manages to be both detached in observation and engaged as a liberal who loves his adopted cultureHe is based in Yemen South Arabian and Yemeni examples and anecdotes pepper the book giving perhaps a slight bias against the Maghreb and Mashri in favour of the c

  8. says: Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

    Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith This was overall a pretty good book One of its best aspects is the elouent style and the depth of the author's knowledge of the subject matter Unfortunately however his knowledge seems to be biased towards the Middle East proper Arabia Levant Mesopotamia Egypt about which he writes profusely whereas the Maghreb is depicted with only some sketchy less satisfying details Thus many uninformed readers might assume that hist

  9. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith

    (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith This book deserves to be remembered as a modern day classic of scholarship Tim Mackintosh Smith writes with great lucidity and insight and he has a way with words Throughout the book there are some nice alliterative flourishes For instance describing the Abbasid Caliphate as ‘200 years of pathos and 300 years of bathos’ as well some very insightful comments about Islam such as ‘The uran was embalmed in sanctity an

  10. says: (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

    Tim Mackintosh-Smith â 7 Free read Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith (Arabs by Tim Mackintosh–Smith) [PDF/EBOOK] ß Tim Mackintosh–Smith This book had me captivated until we arrived at the modern period What started as a brilliantly emphatic history of the Arabs from b

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Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Free read ↠ Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith ✓ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Cing this process to the origins of the Arabic language rather than the advent of Islam Tim Mackintosh Smith begins his narrative than a thousand years before Muhammad and focuses on how Arabic both spoken and written has functioned as a vital source of shared cultural identity over the millennia   Mackintosh Smith reveals how lingu. In 1992 on a flight from Cairo to Sana a I found myself sitting next to an Englishman of almost exactly my age who was returning to his home in Yemen Smalltalk developed into conversation which developed into an offer of a lift from the airport into the city Once he had blagged his way through immigration he didn t have a visa the lift developed into an offer to stay at his house for the night which led to me using his house as my base for the next six weeks as I explored that magnificent country and got to know its extraordinary people That in turn led on to a friendship which has now lasted nearly 30 yearsDuring that six weeks Tim began work on his first book Yemen Travels in Dictionary Land That won the Thomas Cook Travel Book of the Year in 1998 bizarrely another friend was also shortlisted for the prize that year and he then went on to write a number of books and appear in a TV travelogue on Ibn Battuta whose 14th century voyages Tim spent a decade retracingGreat though those books were this latest of his is in another league entirely and deserves to become one of the classics of Middle Eastern scholarship This is not bias through friendship I ve given low marks for friends books on this website before Most extraordinary of all he wrote it in the middle of a civil war I have an email from him dated about 18 months before publication in which he talks poignantly of a dinner party he attended at our house only two or three years earlier belonging to an unreachable past and throughout the book he makes freuent references to the conflict outside my window The book is very much a history of the Arabs rather than the history of the Arabs It starts in pre historic times and as with all histories that begin in pre history that section of the book is problematic being based on very limited information and necessarily being very speculative That said he deals with this difficult period admirably and whilst it may not be the most gripping section of the book it is far absorbing than most pre historic sections in history books than one of which has caused me to abandon a bookWhat makes the pre historic section particularly interesting is that much of it is an exploration of exactly who the Arabs are This uestion develops into a central theme if not the central theme of the book Are they the settled agrarians of Southern Mesopotamia and Arabia Felix Are they the nomads of the desert region in between Are they the people who embraced Islam in the initial 7th century conuests and who unlike the Turks and Persians still preserve that culture Are they as the modern pan Arabists would have it anyone who speaks Arabic As the book progresses it becomes rooted in recorded history and therefore accessible getting fully into its stride when it reaches the time of Mohammad Even then and as he progresses from Mohammed through the Umayyads and Abbasids he treats the chronology as being less important than the central theme of the book namely the exploration of the very identity of the Arabs Covering that period he focuses therefore not on who conuered which territory and when but on the wider history of how the Arabs took their culture belief and identity to distant regions and saw them adopted by the inhabitants of those regions only for the conuerors themselves to gradually become isolated and disempowered not only in the lands that they had conuered but also in their own home territories This will frustrate someone looking for a conventional history or someone looking for an entry level introduction to the Arabs He spends longer for example covering the tradition of foreign rulers sending an empty palanuin to Mecca for the Hajj than he does on the Suez Crisis the former being a vehicle to explore and highlight bigger themes of identity change and belief than the latter which arguably had a greater impact on Britain and France than it did on the Arab World anyway A basic grounding in the Arab World and the Arabs will therefore help the reader and the better one knows them the one is likely to take from this book His exploration of their ability probably not uniue amongst Arabs but arguably refined by them to levels that no one else has achieved to pretend to ignore incontrovertible evidence in front of their eyes in order to preserve a societal belief system and not rock the boat particularly resonated with me Something I learnt indirectly through the book is that the Arabs love of conspiracy theories with which I have had a lifelong frustration because of the extent to which it impedes self knowledge and growth seems to be rooted less in blaming outsiders as I have always thought than though no less destructive in supporting and preserving the societal status uo by not blaming their own leadersTim is a big lover and student of language often using the etymology of Arabic words to explore hidden meanings behind them His love of language extends to English with his use of written English being unuestionably scholarly I was grateful to be reading on a Kindle which enabled me to easily look up some of his erudite language something I ve never felt a need to do when conversing with him his spoken English being that of a regular Joe This raises interesting uestions as to whom the book will appeal to As I wrote above the better one knows the Arab World the one will get out of this book but for those actually themselves from the region the very scholarship of the book and I must emphasise that the book is one of lively scholarship and not dry academia is going to be a barrier you need to speak good English arguably better than most native English speakers to really get to grips with this book entirely A mutual Arab friend tells me that Tim s working on a translation of the book adding that this will undoubtedly mean that it s censored in some countries thereby making it a must read and therefore a best seller on the black market which comment is consistent with my previous point about pretending to ignore in order not to rock the boat The modern sections of the book dealing with the 19th century awakening Nasser pan Arabism and the rise of the autocrats and Islamists are by reason of their proximity the most accessible in the book What is remarkable about his coverage of those periods is his understanding and analysis of the significance of very recent and even contemporary events in the wider sociological political and geopolitical development of the region over a period of time that runs into the millennia It is extremely hard to understand the wider significance of events as they are unfolding around you Tim does that convincingly though only time will tell if he has done so accuratelyThis is a book that starts strongly and then just gets stronger and stronger as it becomes and contemporary Very very impressive A must read for those with an interest in the region

Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Free read ↠ Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith ✓ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith A riveting comprehensive history of the Arab peoples and tribes that explores the role of language as a cultural touchstone This kaleidoscopic book covers almost 3000 years of Arab history and shines a light on the footloose Arab peoples and tribes who conuered lands and disseminated their language and culture over vast distances Tra. One of the most fascinating books I have ever read Mackintosh Smith masterfully weaves the history of the Arabs through the lens of the evolution of the Arabic language articulating his mastery of the Arabic language and how it has shaped the people in turn I learned a massive amount from this book The history read like a thriller and the author is an incredible story teller However towards the end of the book the author s hatred of Israel and Zionism came out very strongly as could be expected in a book like this It was a shame the book was written that way but was also very informative to the Arab view of Zionism Nonetheless the book is fascinating and I probably will read it again

Summary Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Free read ↠ Arabs by Tim Mackintosh-Smith ✓ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Read & Download ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB â Tim Mackintosh-Smith Istic developments from pre Islamic poetry to the growth of script Muhammad’s use of writing and the later problems of printing Arabic have helped and hindered the progress of Arab history and investigates how even in today’s politically fractured post–Arab Spring environment Arabic itself is still a source of unity and disunit. This is a humane scholarly but highly readable book by one of that diminishing breed the sensitive British Arabist who is as much Arab as British and who manages to be both detached in observation and engaged as a liberal who loves his adopted cultureHe is based in Yemen South Arabian and Yemeni examples and anecdotes pepper the book giving perhaps a slight bias against the Maghreb and Mashri in favour of the complexities of the Arabian heartlands But you can only do so much in 536 pages Order has to be given to a tale of 3000 years Arab origins in the tension between badawah and haradah and the importance of the Arab poetic heritage are to be found in the Arabian Peninsular and are central to understanding what may be to be an Arab The bias is legitimateI say what it may be to be an Arab because being an Arab is an uncertain business much as being a European is Mackintosh Smith does an excellent job in working through those uncertainties and the reinventions and variations on what being an Arab means at any one point in historyHe does two things that give perspective First he refuses to tell the tale as the same tale as the rise of Islam giving due weight to the 1500 years before Muhammed as much as to the 1450 or so since his arrival as unifier of the Peninsula under a particularly dynamic form of monotheismThe second thing he does is not define Arab by particular uses of the term arab as it shifts and changes over time but by its truly salient characteristic which is the use of an Arabic language derived from Arabian poetry still a political force and the uran a poetic bookI can express an interest here as not being an Arabist deliberately so but having worked with Arabs for a uarter of a century as well as Zionists for a decade before that Saudis and Syrians intimately Moroccans Irais and Emiratis seriously and many others tangentiallyI can attest to the pecularities of the culture its simultaneous unity and divisions the effects of foreign empires the continuing importance of rhetoric and the poetic phrase the brutal realism the intellectual melancholy and the ambiguities involved in truth tellingMackintosh Smith brought it all together for me uite nicely and gave this experience context It confirmed an intuition that cultures taken as a whole whether English or Chinese Arab or Persian have deep roots where the use of language helps to frame the freedom of any individualThe book is not really a straight narrative so much as a chronological exploration of themes that becomes increasingly anecdotal towards the end The last section from 1800 is the weakest only because the anecdotes seem most disconnected and most affected by the author s sentimentThe author does something I do not usually forgive as you will see in my other reviews but will forgive in him distract us in the final moments of the book with the current existential despair of the modern liberal trying to cope with the monstrosities in viewIn this case I forgive because his despair comes from having been at his post in war torn Yemen come under fire and stood his ground as long as he could in the tradition of many a medieval Arab intellectual and because he wears his liberal politics as lightly as his conscience permitsAnd I forgive him for the insights and the fundamentally sound and substantial weaving of a deep knowledge of the Arabic language and sympathy for the speakers of the language with the tough realism of the natural historianHe is also subtle enough without abandoning his English liberal values to show respect for the possibility that the things that might make him despair about Arab political culture are a matter for Arabs to work through and not for outsidersSo we have a strange situation by the end of the book where he is trying to suare his anger at the cruelty of anarcharchs and demonocracy and the Arab world s uneven to say the least relationship to truth telling with his acceptance of it as a uniue and independent cultureMy own experience and the book s solid exposition of the soul of the Arab in history slippery though the concept is through three thousand years of existence could create a natural despair that the culture will ever become good like ours But is it really any of our businessOf course ours is not at all good It just has its own rhetoric and a different history that allows the bad to be limited in scope Mackintosh Smith rightly regrets the lack of institutional structures that allow Arabs to choose their own paths rather than submit to autocratsBut wishes are cheap The blundering of neo conservatives and before that of the insertion of Zionism like a wedge into the region and imperialism before that has not helped very much in creating the possibilities for organic institutional liberal democratic developmentArabs in short have an inchoate but very real and complex culture that is uite separate from Islam yet heavily inflected by it just as Europeans have a very real and complex culture heavily inflected by Christianity but uite separate from it both with pagan pasts as wellThe Arabs though are bound by a language constructed out of a book and tradition whereas if Europe was also constructed out of a book and its competition with the classical tradition Europe was to break into competitive languages that helped force through national institutional structuresThe Arabic language is both a binder of peoples from Morocco to Oman and Ira to Sudan and also a false friend insofar as the dialects across the region can be almost unintelligible to each other and the high language tends to bind intellectuals and elites rather than peoplesArab nationalism where one suspects the author has some sympathy at least based on his account of Nasser attempted to force the pace through radio and print rhetoric but such nationalisms can only be partially forced from above and then only over long periods of time on fertile groundThe messiness of the last half century comes from traditional order maintaining national autocrats maintaining the fiction of Arab ness and also trying to manage Islamic sentiment when that sentiment in fact does not and cannot include all Arabs and has dissident variants itselfWhen Arab ness gets ideologised it has a tendency to be closer to a form of soft fascism in European terms than anything liberal although one of the few areas of neglect in the book is the brief incursion of socialist ideas into the region in the last century I tend to conservative pessimism on all this basically Mackintosh Smith s liberal pessimism but without the undercurrent of suppressed outrage but I agree with him when he suggests that it is for Arabs and not outsiders to define themselvesThe tide of Islamism now seems to have partially abated This is probably as much to do with the passing of generations as to any counter terrorist action But as it recedes the association of Arabism firmly with Islam crowds out the very secular nationalisms that are its best hopeMackintosh Smith is bitter about Bashar Al Assad as many liberal Arabs must be but in the brutal context between even moderate Political Islam and secular nationalism the Baathist may be a last bulwark against an inappropriate Sunni appropriation of an entire linguistic cultureWe might liken this to the neo confucian appropriation of what it is to be Chinese by the Chinese Communist Party or the attempts so far beaten off to rediscover Europe as a Christian entity by the emergent European populist RightBeing Chinese or European or Arab is not coterminous with being Neo Confucian Christian or Muslim In the first case because China is a multiplicity of traditions in itself and in the last two because these religions are global and yet not everyone in either culture accepts themPerhaps Nasser s main error was to construct out of very little a general Arab nationalism instead of accepting that there was the potential for many collaborating Arab nationalisms based on the many inheritances of the Arab conuests but where secularism had room for respected minoritiesBut that was then and this is now The error was historically comprehensible All Arab errors are historically comprehensible and thanks to this book we cannot say we cannot comprehend them President Nonsense bin Nonsense might have benefited from it had it existed in 2003Ironically the only modern Arab Leader who may be getting it is MBS in Saudi Arabia the heartland of the Arabs who is busy building up a possibly viable Saudi nationalism as an ideology which permits greater difference within an historically determined Islamic framework And yet the general view of the West has to be that MBS is the autocrat s autocrat at the moment and he is not even King yet The methodology is that of Henry VIII and Francis I Both monarchs were consolidators of national feeling into a viable nation state with the dynastic as means So all in all for all the anecdotalism an excellent guide to the creation and history of the Arab community that respects its subject and its readers and which I can strongly recommend Incidentally I also want to praise Yale for the attractive design and binding of this edition